Winter dance show feature: ‘The City’

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By Robyn Belt

, Allison Minchoff ’16, Laura Schad ’16 and myself. In my creative process, it is important for me to have a vision of where I want my piece to go, so selecting a theme is my first step and my choice of music and movement flows naturally from that. After  months of brainstorming, I decided to center my piece on the diversity in NYC and the misperceptions and stereotypes that come along with that. This was primarily inspired by my experience working with the homeless in NYC. I was struck by my own prejudices and assumptions about them and their misunderstandings of me. I want to explore how dance can help us move beyond these stereotypes.

Do you find it harder to follow or create choreography?

Creedon: It is certainly much more difficult to create choreography than to learn it. It puts me in a vulnerable state and requires me to trust myself and what I create, which can definitely be a challenge, but it is well worth it.

Yuqiao, What is your relationship to the theme of NYC?

Yuan: NYC is diverse; people from all over the world come here and perceive the city differently. The character in my dance piece is one of those “aliens,” who is exposed to a new culture.

How will you give the audience this “alien” perspective?

Yuan: In contrast to the city’s fast pace, this dance piece is  a slow-down in terms of music and dance style. But it smoothly tells a story through the dancer’s movements that carry the true voice from her heart. I am trying to make the most use of my fan in my choreography, since it is not only a costume for the dancer, but also a “window” towards the outside world for the character. She transforms herself from an introvert into an extrovert who bravely embraces the new world. This dance piece is choreographed based on a “foreign” perspective. The dancer is going to use her body language to “tell” the audience her changes in both emotional experience and psychological process in the city.

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