Research & U: Computer Science

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By Joshua Ostrer

 

The computer science department has a number of very interesting senior projects this year. This year’s projects include: studying contemporary social movements through Twitter, simulating the development of Rome in a computer game, using browser history for identification, gait recognition using the XBOX Kinect, using agents to model the eBay economy and even a mobile application to determine blood alcohol level.

Adam Burns and Max Neumeyer’s project consists of creating a mobile application to test an individual’s BAC (Blood Alcohol Content) level.

“We are working to create a ‘mobile intoxication assessment tool’ which takes the form of an android app called the ‘Tipsy Tester’ which is capable of determining an inebriated individuals approximate blood alcohol content (BAC) based on the individuals performance on a set of cognitive ability test of our own design,” said Burns.

The project actually originated from a casual conversation.

“Max and I were working on some homework late last winter term and he mentioned in passing how handy it would be if someone could tell how drunk they were with their smart phone. From there the idea grew into the “Tipsy Tester” application,” explained Burns.

While the project has been underway for over a year, Burns speculates the project could take another year or more before absolute completion. The group has plans for their project.

“We are currently working to patent this method of BAC determination and more specifically the application itself…we could see this tool being used by law enforcement,” said Burns.

It wouldn’t be surprising for the “Tipsy Tester” to be successful; computer science senior projects have carried onto bigger things before.

“Seniors are often able to leverage their research experience to get jobs or get into graduate schools. For example, Dave Sayles ‘10, a digital art major, worked with me on desktop rapid prototyping machines, and now has a job at Makerbot Industries, in Brooklyn…Tim Kuehn ‘12 is now working on a follow up of Dave Sayles’ research,” said computer science professor John Rieffel

“Soft robotics research performed by Davis Knox ‘11 was the basis for a paper we presented at the 2011 European Conference for Artificial Life (ECAL) in Paris this past August,”said Rieffel. “I am continually surprised by the high quality of research that our students are able to produce in the space of nine months of effort.”

 

Adam Burns and Max Neumeyer’s project consists of creating a mobile application to test an individual’s BAC (Blood Alcohol Content) level. “We are working to create a ‘mobile intoxication assessment tool’ which takes the form of an android app called the ‘Tipsy Tester’ which is capable of determining an inebriated individual’s approximate blood alcohol content (BAC) based on the individual’s performance on a set of cognitive ability tests of our own design,” said Burns.

The project actually originated from a casual conversation. “Max and I were working on some homework late last winter term and he mentioned in passing how handy it would be if someone could tell how drunk they were with their smart phone. From there the idea grew into the “Tipsy Tester” application,” explained Burns.

While the project has been underway for over a year, Burns speculates the project could take another year or more before absolute completion. The group has plans for their project. “We are currently working to patent this method of BAC determination and more specifically the application itself…we could see this tool being used by law enforcement,” said Burns.

It wouldn’t be surprising for the “Tipsy Tester” to be successful; computer science senior projects have carried onto bigger things before. “Seniors are often able to leverage their research experience to get jobs or get into graduate schools. For example, Dave Sayles ‘10, a digital art major, worked with me on desktop rapid prototyping machines, and now has a job at Makerbot Industries, in Brooklyn…Tim Kuehn ‘12 is now working on a follow up of Dave Sayles’ research,” said computer science professor John Rieffel.

“Soft robotics research performed by Davis Knox ‘11 was the basis for a paper we presented at the 2011 European Conference for Artificial Life (ECAL) in Paris this past August,” added Rieffel. “I am continually surprised by the high quality of research that our students are able to produce in the space of nine months of effort.”

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