Universal censorship of Halloween costumes ruins the spirit of the holiday

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As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

Happy Halloween!

2 COMMENTS

  1. I disagree that there is a censorship that exists on Halloween. This “censorship” you are complaining about is actually what you are encouraging people to do when they see a costume that offends them: start a dialogue and tell them why it’s offensive. Your telling people that’s how they should react and that’s what people are doing and as a result others are realizing they shouldn’t be wearing that costume. True censorship would be in the form of college official punishing individuals, by points or some other official sanction, for wearing offensive costumes. That does not happen on our campus. Instead we (the student body in general, RAs, and some faculty) strive to educate why certain costumes are offensive and let individuals make their own judgement call after they’ve had the offense explained to them.

    For example, looking at your argument that a child dressing up as a Native American is innocent and the child should not be chastised. My perspective, as a person with Native American heritage, is that there is a right and wrong way to “dress up” as a Native American. First off, it should be stressed that Native American attire is not a costume, but has deep meaning for the Native American people. Many tribes have specific intricate meaning and symbolism with the bead work, and the headdress has meaning as well and is reserved for specific members of the tribe to wear only. Also the symbolism and traditions are not universal acrossed all tribes, so if one dresses as a Native American for Halloween, there is the risk that they may mix articles of clothing from different tribes, they may trivialize the symbolism in the design, and they in affect they are lumping all different tribes filled with very different traditions into one group and in affect devaluing the culture of those tribes. Now to the point a child can’t most likely comprehend all this because of their young age, I agree they are innocent if they make these mistakes and the child should not be chastised, BUT the parent should. If the child is truly interested in Native American culture, the parent should take the time to research the culture to make sure they are not just preptuating stereotypes but being as authentic as possible. Also the parent must emphasize that the Native American attire is not a costume but has huge cultural importance to the Native American people. Otherwise their is the risk the child will grow up believing the stereotypes and not appreciating the culture behind what they choose to wear at Halloween. This example is focused on native Americans, but can be applied to all races and cultures.

    Yes Halloween is a fun holiday, and I, along with others who express when they are offend, do not want the fun to be taken out of Halloween. I believe that Halloween can be educational at the same time as being fun. If a child is truly interested and passionate about dressing up as someone or something from another culture for Halloween, a parent should take advantage of that excitement and use it as motivation when encouraging the child to learn about that other culture. Halloween has the opportunity to be one of the most beneficial holidays in terms of teaching moments, if individuals take advantage of that opportunity. In regards to young adults who choose to dress up representing other cultures, I don’t discourage them from this choice. I simply encourage them to research those cultures on their own before Halloween night to make sure their costumes are as authentic as possible rather than stereotypical.

    And if ones schedule is too busy to do this research in order to make sure ones costume isn’t offensive, there are plenty of other options for costumes like movie characters or animals. These costumes are just as fun, and run much less risk of stereotyping, trivializing or dehumanizing a group of people and their culture.

  2. As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!As the leaves start to change color and fall, and as it starts to get more brisk out, one can’t help but notice that Halloween is just around the corner.

    While Halloween is a widely celebrated holiday that people of all ages participate in, it still remains a controversial holiday in regards to what costumes people should or shouldn’t wear. What it comes down to is whether a costume is viewed as offensive or not. I grant that, on any other day of the year, wearing an insensitive costume in public would be despicable.

    However, it seems absurd to me that there is a push, especially from college educated individuals, to censor what a person wears during a holiday where being completely different, offensive and scary is the entire point.

    What it boils down to, I believe, is the intent behind the costume, which many proponents of costume censorship during Halloween don’t seem to understand.

    For many Halloweens, as a kid growing up, I would dress up as a ninja. I did not do this because I was trying to steal the cultural heritage of Japan and exploit an entire race. I dressed up as a ninja because I thought they were one of the coolest warriors in all of history.

    Running from house to house and getting candy with my friends, dressed up in all black like a ninja from feudal Japan, would made me so happy. Why would anyone want to suppress this completely innocent joy just because it could be deemed offensive?

    Anything can be deemed offensive by anyone but that does not mean they are necessarily justified or right. This was seen last year at Yale University. A faculty member, Nicholas Christakis suggested, “If you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.”

    The response to Christakis’ thoughtful solution ironically resulted in more censorship of freedom, protest and daily verbal assaults on Christakis and his wife until they finally decided to step down from their positions at Yale.

    You are not fighting for liberal principles if you call for censorship of freedom of expression. That is a fact.However, I am not saying there shouldn’t be any sort of boundary. Even though I think everyone has the right to wear whatever they want, I do believe there is a line and that it depends on intent.

    This is a hallmark of our justice system in this country, I might add. If someone is wearing a Halloween costume to solely exploit a certain demographic or group of people than they should absolutely be ridiculed for that.

    If a little child, however, is wearing a Native American headdress because they really loved learning about them in history class and they admire Native American’s values, why would anyone put the child in the same group as a terrible person who is trying to dehumanize someone to an extreme extent with their costume?

    What it all comes down to is dialogue.If you find someone’s costume offensive during Halloween, then you should talk with them like an adult and try to find their reasoning and intent behind it.If you think anyone should wear anything they want, even if it’s the most offensive possible costume ever, explain to people why you hold your views and what values you believe in.

    On the other hand, calls for universal censorship, wild accusations and ironically witch-like hunts during Halloween for whoever is wearing an “offensive” costume will only lead to more social regression within our country.

    Happy Halloween!

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